Chemotherapy

Immunotherapy And Chemotherapy Cancer Treatments

So you’ve been told that your cancer is treated with chemo. What does it mean exactly? Are the side effects as harmful as you heard? How effective is that? Why not a different kind of treatment? What about immunotherapy? These are essential questions that you should ask your doctor. To give you a head start here’s some necessary information about these two common cancer therapies: immunotherapy and chemotherapy.

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So you’ve been told that your cancer is treated with chemo. What does it mean exactly? Are the side effects as harmful as you heard? How effective is that? Why not a different kind of treatment? What about immunotherapy? These are essential questions that you should ask your doctor and to know more about cancer treatments you can visit websites about cancer organization and click their contact us link to send them an email! To give you a head start here’s some necessary information about these two common cancer therapies: immunotherapy and chemotherapy.

Chemotherapy

The use of drugs or medicines to treat cancers is chemotherapy. Unlike surgical or radiotherapy treatments, where cancer is removed, killed or damaged in a particular area, chemotherapy works throughout the body and can be used to kill cancer cells that are metastasized to other parts of the body. Chemotherapy can be used to cure cancer, fight cancer or relieve it.

Common side effects of chemotherapy include fatigue, hair loss, mild bruising and bleeding, anemia, infection, changes in appetite, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, problems with the mouth, tongue, and throat (such as pain and swallowing). , Nail and skin changes, bladder and urine changes, kidney problems, weight changes, mood swings, fertility problems and changes in sexual function and libido. It is important to know that the fact that all these side effects are present does not mean that you will experience them. You may have few, or none at all. Chemotherapy affects everyone differently.

Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy is relatively new to the list of cancer treatments and is used in conjunction with other cancer treatments. It negates the negative symptoms that patients experience. However, the procedure is not suitable for all cancer patients as the FDA has approved treatment for the following types, including melanoma, leukemia, kidney, prostate, breast cancer, cervix, ovarian cancer, colon cancer, and lung cancer.

Treatment will be given in a variety of ways, including injecting the vaccine, taking the prescribed pill or by intravenous administration. The use of the body’s immune system to fight cancer is referred to as immunotherapy.

This can be done in two ways:

– By stimulating your immune system to attack cancer cells or generally work harder.

– By getting components of the immune system like artificial proteins.

Immunotherapy works better with certain types of cancer than others. It is sometimes used as the only treatment and at other times in conjunction with other therapies. The immunotherapy can be administered intravenously (IV), orally, topically or intravesically (directly into the bladder).

The side effects that can happen with immunotherapy depend on the type of immunotherapy you receive. However, side effects of the skin at the needle site and flu-like symptoms (fever, chills, weakness, nausea or vomiting) can usually be dizziness, fatigue, joint or muscle pain, shortness of breath, headache, high or low blood pressure), weight gain due to retention of fluid , Swelling, sinus congestion, palpitations and risk of infection.

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